Government of New Brunswick

Blind Hill/Hidden Driveway/Dangerous Intersection

Questions we are often asked:

  • There is a blind hill just before my driveway which makes it very dangerous for me to get out on the road. How can I get a Blind Hill or Hidden Driveway sign installed?
  • Who do I contact to have Blind Hill/Hidden Driveway signs installed?

The New Brunswick Department of Transportation and Infrastructure strives to follow the standards and guidelines established by the Transportation Association of Canada (TAC) in the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Canada (MUTCDC) with respect to roadway signing. The Manual has been developed by experienced Transportation professionals throughout Canada taking into consideration applicable transportation and human factors related research and experience from a variety of sources.

Signs such as Hidden Driveway, Blind Hill and Dangerous Intersection have not been installed by DTI on the provincial roadway network for many years. These signs were found to have little to no impact on driver behaviour, and tended to give a false sense of security to motorists entering from their driveway. The overuse of warning signs can result in disrespect for them, and other traffic control devices.  

However, you may see them installed within some municipalities on municipal streets.

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Deaf Child Area/Autistic Child Area

Questions we are often asked:

  • My child is hearing impaired. Who do I contact to get Deaf Child signs installed on my road to keep him/her safe?
  • My grandchild is autistic and I am worried about his/her safety. How do I go about getting Autistic Child signs installed on my road?

The New Brunswick Department of Transportation and Infrastructure strives to follow the standards and guidelines established by the Transportation Association of Canada (TAC) in the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Canada (MUTCDC) with respect to roadway signing. The Manual has been developed by experienced Transportation professionals throughout Canada taking into consideration applicable transportation and human factors related research and experience from a variety of sources.

Signs such as Deaf Child, Autistic Child, Blind Child/Person have not been installed by DTI on the provincial roadway network for many years. These signs were found to have little to no impact on driver behaviour, and tended to give a false sense of security to caregivers who believed the signs would make drivers more vigilant and cautious.

While you may see them installed within some municipalities on municipal streets, these signs are no longer recognized by the Transportation Association of Canada and are not installed by DTI on provincial highways.

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Children Playing

Questions we are often asked:

  • There are a lot of children who live or play along my roadway and people are driving way too fast. How do I get Children Playing signs installed?
  • I am worried about my children playing in our front yard because of the traffic on the road. Where do I get Children Playing signs?
  • I am afraid to let my children cross the road to play with their friends/ride their bikes because of the speed of traffic on the road. Who can I contact to get Children Playing signs so people will slow down?

The New Brunswick Department of Transportation and Infrastructure strives to follow the standards and guidelines established by the Transportation Association of Canada (TAC) in the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Canada (MUTCDC) with respect to roadway signing. The Manual has been developed by experienced Transportation professionals throughout Canada taking into consideration applicable transportation and human factors related research and experience from a variety of sources.

Children Playing signs have not been installed on the provincial highway network by DTI for many years. These signs were found to have little to no impact on driver behaviour, and tended to give a false sense of security to caregivers who believed the signs would make drivers more vigilant and cautious.

childrenplaying

“Playground Ahead” signs, very similar to the Children Playing sign, are reserved for public playground areas located adjacent to the highway where children can be expected to gather regularly. These signs are not required where playgrounds are located away from a roadway and where natural barriers such as trees and earth berms, or manmade barriers such as fences and buildings, significantly restrict vehicle access to a playground area.

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No Jake Brake Signs

Questions we are often asked:

  • Trucks are constantly using their Jake brake going past my house. Can I get a “No Jake Brake” sign installed?
  • Who do I contact to have a “No Jake Brake” sign installed?

The New Brunswick Department of Transportation and Infrastructure does not recommend the installation of “No Jake Brake” or “Avoid Engine Brake” signs. The engine retarder brakes – commonly referred to as jake brakes – are part of a truck’s safety equipment to be used in certain situations. It is not possible to determine when a driver may be operationally required to use the engine brake in an area, therefore the installation of signs prohibiting their use is not supported.

While you may see them installed on some municipal streets, DTI does not install them on provincial roadways. Some municipalities have enacted a noise by-law and enforce the ‘unnecessary’ use of engine retarder brakes with respect to the by-law.

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horse

 

Equestrian/Cattle Crossing Signs

Questions we are often asked:

  • I regularly ride my horse along the roadway near my house. How do I get an Equestrian Crossing sign?
  • My horse barn is across the street from the field/trail where I ride, can I get an Equestrian Crossing sign?
  • Who do I contact to get a “Cattle Crossing” sign installed?

The New Brunswick Department of Transportation and Infrastructure strives to follow the standards and guidelines established by the Transportation Association of Canada (TAC) in the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Canada (MUTCDC) with respect to roadway signing. The Manual has been developed by experienced Transportation professionals throughout Canada taking into consideration applicable transportation and human factors related research and experience from a variety of sources.

“Equestrian Crossing” signs may be installed in advance of a fixed crossing location used by commercial horse-back riding establishments with six or more horses available for rental.

If you feel you meet the requirements for an “Equestrian Crossing” sign, please send your request detailing the specific area to your local area District Office or to  TrafficRequests@gnb.ca

cow

“Cattle Crossing” signs may be installed in advance of a fixed location where there are regular daily cattle crossings.

If you feel you meet the requirements for a “Cattle Crossing” sign, please send your request detailing the specific area to your local area District Office or to TrafficRequests@gnb.ca

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deer


Wildlife (Deer or Moose) Warning Signs

Questions we are often asked:

  • There are so many deer being hit near my property.  How do I get deer crossing signs installed?
  • There are no warning signs about deer crossing the road at this area. Who do I contact to get them installed?
  • I am concerned about safety because of the amount of deer and moose in my area. Can the Department install warning signs to make people aware?

The New Brunswick Department of Transportation and Infrastructure strives to follow the standards and guidelines established by the Transportation Association of Canada (TAC) in the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Canada (MUTCDC) with respect to roadway signing. The Manual has been developed by experienced Transportation professionals throughout Canada taking into consideration applicable transportation and human factors related research and experience from a variety of sources.

Wildlife may be encountered while driving through any area of our beautiful province. Deer in particular are often attracted to communities and populated areas where food sources provided by bird feeders, shrubs, fruit orchards, flower and vegetable gardens are readily accessible.  

moose

In an effort to provide for effective signage, wildlife warning signs are reserved for areas that demonstrate a high level of deer or moose activity. The signs do not identify a particular place where deer or moose cross the roadway. Rather, they typically encompass an area of highway up to 10km in length.

DTI Traffic Safety staff communicate with the Department of Energy and Resource Development (ERD) wildlife biologists, local area staff, and review other available data to determine whether an area meets the criteria for warning sign installation.

It is important to note that wildlife may be particularly difficult to detect in the dark, and drivers need to exercise caution at all times. Deer eyes reflect in vehicle headlights. Moose have darker fur and their eyes do not reflect, making them even more difficult to identify at night.

If you feel an area should be reviewed with respect to the need for wildlife warning signs, please send your request detailing the specific area and the concern(s) to TrafficRequests@gnb.ca .

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